past Exhibition

    Héctor Zamora, Reductio Ad Absurdum, 2012. 1976 ALJO travel trailer, 35 tons of native Arizona sand. Courtesy of the artist. © Héctor Zamora. Photo: Dan Vermillion

    Héctor Zamora, Reductio Ad Absurdum, 2012. 1976 ALJO travel trailer, 35 tons of native Arizona sand. Courtesy of the artist. © Héctor Zamora. Photo: Dan Vermillion

    Héctor Zamora, Reductio Ad Absurdum, 2012. 1976 ALJO travel trailer, 35 tons of native Arizona sand. Courtesy of the artist. © Héctor Zamora. Photo: Dan Vermillion

    Héctor Zamora, Reductio Ad Absurdum, 2012. 1976 ALJO travel trailer, 35 tons of native Arizona sand. Courtesy of the artist. © Héctor Zamora. Photo: Dan Vermillion

    Héctor Zamora, installation view, OG-107 Scenery, 2012. U.S. Army-issue reserve parachute (model: T-10R MIRPS-SLCP, color: olive green-107 color, size: 24-foot diameter); electric fans; airplane hangar. Courtesy of the artist. © Héctor Zamora. Photo: Dan Vermillion

    Héctor Zamora, installation view, OG-107 Scenery, 2012. U.S. Army-issue reserve parachute (model: T-10R MIRPS-SLCP, color: olive green-107 color, size: 24-foot diameter); electric fans; airplane hangar. Courtesy of the artist. © Héctor Zamora. Photo: Dan Vermillion

    Héctor Zamora, installation view, OG-107 Scenery, 2012. U.S. Army-issue reserve parachute (model: T-10R MIRPS-SLCP, color: olive green-107 color, size: 24-foot diameter); electric fans; airplane hangar. Courtesy of the artist. © Héctor Zamora. Photo: Dan Vermillion

Architecture + Art: Héctor Zamora


Oct 27 – Jan 27, 2013

Description

Architecture + Art: Héctor Zamora is a site-specific project in response to the environmental and architectural context of the Museum in Scottsdale, as well as the Arizona desert. Artist Héctor Zamora creates dynamic installations that explore the social implications of architecture. Focusing on urbanism/suburbanism in the wake of the U.S. housing collapse, Zamora’s installation at SMoCA challenges viewers to reinterpret the intersection of our constructed world and the natural landscape. An artwork in a separate satellite location critically reconsiders the presence of military operations throughout the Sonoran desert’s vast public lands.

 

Organized by the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art
Sponsored by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts; Tamar Weiss, in memory of Emil Weiss; and Paul Giancola and Carrie Lynn Richardson

Special thank you to Cutter Aviation

 

Exhibition Brochure